Advertisment

Nations Pledge to Triple Nuclear Power: A Landmark Agreement at COP28

author-image
Safak Costu
New Update
Nations Pledge to Triple Nuclear Power: A Landmark Agreement at COP28

In a landmark agreement at the COP28 climate summit in Dubai, over 20 nations have made an audacious pledge to triple the current global nuclear capacity by 2050. This ambitious target necessitates increasing the capacity from the present 370 gigawatts to a staggering 1,110 gigawatts. The commitment was announced by Emmanuel Macron, the French President, and endorsed by other global leaders, including US climate envoy, John Kerry. The pact underscores a critical revival of nuclear energy, deemed crucial for achieving net-zero emissions, adhering to the Paris Accord's goal of restricting planetary heating to 1.5 degrees Celsius, and ensuring a stable, low-carbon energy supply as the world transitions to renewables.

Advertisment

Challenges and Opportunities for the Nuclear Industry

The nuclear industry, which has witnessed stagnation for several decades due to regulatory and financial challenges, public safety apprehensions, and project delays, now confronts the formidable task of overcoming these issues to meet the ambitious goal. Critics argue that high upfront costs, construction timeframes, and project delays make tripling capacity an unrealistic proposition. However, industry executives and supporters believe that government pledges and advancements in technology could spur growth in nuclear power.

Emergence of New Technologies

Advertisment

New technologies such as small modular reactors (SMRs) are emerging as potential solutions due to their shorter construction times. These modern innovations, if successful, could significantly contribute to achieving the ambitious target set at COP28. But environmental groups and some academics remain skeptical about the feasibility and safety of nuclear expansion.

Role of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Russia

In the wake of the ambitious pledge, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is working on harmonizing approval rules to facilitate technology sharing and address the need for advanced fuels. Russia currently dominates the production of high-assay low-enriched uranium (HALEU), which is critical for new reactor technologies. This dominance could play a pivotal role in the global nuclear expansion plan.

Addressing Climate Change

Despite the challenges, the nuclear industry's role in addressing climate change remains undisputed. The triple capacity pledge, coupled with a simultaneous call to triple renewable energy capacity by 2030, resonates with the global commitment to a significant acceleration in the energy transition. The convergence of these initiatives at COP28 signifies a historic and potentially transformative moment in the global fight against climate change.

Advertisment
Advertisment