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Cyanobacteria's Revolutionary Photosynthesis: Harnessing Far-Red Light

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Dil Bar Irshad
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Cyanobacteria's Revolutionary Photosynthesis: Harnessing Far-Red Light

In groundbreaking research, scientists have unearthed the extraordinary photosynthetic ability of cyanobacteria to harness far-red light, a spectrum of light largely invisible to the human eye. By delving into the evolutionary development of this unique trait, the study presents a revolutionary perspective on photosynthesis, potentially transforming our understanding of biotechnology, agriculture, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

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Unveiling the Invisible: Far-Red Light Photosynthesis

Commonly, photosynthesis in plants is restricted to the visible light spectrum, spanning from 400 to 700 nanometers (nm), where blue and red light are predominantly used. However, cyanobacteria have evolved to extend beyond this norm, utilizing far-red light in the range of 700 to 800 nm for photosynthesis. This innovative adaptation opens a new window into the previously unknown capabilities of photosynthetic organisms.

Evolutionary Stages: The Birth of a New Photosystem

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The development of this remarkable ability occurred in two pivotal stages. Initially, the emergence of chlorophyll f enabled cyanobacteria to absorb far-red light. The second crucial phase took place around 2 billion years ago, with the evolution of a second photosystem that further optimized the use of far-red light. These two stages signify an unprecedented evolutionary leap, which could redefine the boundaries of photosynthetic systems.

Implications: From Earthly Greens to Alien Life

The ability to harness far-red light could have profound implications for both biotechnology and agriculture. By potentially engineering plants with broader light absorption properties, we could revolutionize the performance of crops under varied light conditions. Furthermore, this discovery holds significant implications for the search for extraterrestrial life. With M-dwarf stars - the most common stars in the universe - predominantly emitting far-red light, the existence of life on planets orbiting these stars becomes a distinct possibility, thus redefining the parameters of our extraterrestrial search.

The study also suggests the possibility of introducing the complex trait of far-red light photosynthesis into other photosynthetic organisms via horizontal gene transfer. This could further demonstrate the highly adaptive nature of photosynthetic systems and lay the groundwork for future research in optimizing light use for crop improvement and biotechnological applications.

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