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Young Venezuelan Prodigy Makes it to Finals of NASA's Art Contest in Florida

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Nimrah Khatoon
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Young Venezuelan Prodigy Makes it to Finals of NASA's Art Contest in Florida

Sara Gavidia Prado, a 10-year-old Venezuelan girl, has achieved a commendable feat by making it to the finals of NASA's art contest in Florida, United States. Inspired by space-themed topics and futuristic drawings of artist Romero Britto, the competition saw the participation of children from all over the state, ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade.

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Exceptional Talent Amongst Peers

Out of the initial 60 participants, only 12 made it to the final, including Sara, a third-grade student at Hialeah Gardens Elementary School in Miami-Dade County, originally from Cabimas, Zulia state. The contest, which drew from a diverse pool of young talent, was a testament to the creativity and innovation inherent in the next generation.

Inspiring Artistic Journey

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Sara's journey to the finals was not just a personal victory, but also an inspiring story of a young girl's pursuit of her passion for art and space. Her artwork, influenced by Romero Britto's signature vibrant, bold patterns and optimistic themes, echoed the contest's space-inspired theme while also showcasing her individual perspective.

Parents' Pride and Winners' Announcement

Edwin Gavidia and Samaris Prado, Sara's parents, expressed immense pride over their daughter's achievement. The award ceremony was graced by the presence of the Florida Lieutenant Governor, Jeanette Núñez, and artist Romero Britto himself. The grand prize was clinched by Rafael Kleiman and Ailynn Chen, whose artworks will be launched into space aboard a SpaceX rocket later this year.

Support for Independent Journalism

The article concludes with a call for financial support for El Pitazo, an independent media outlet that provides verified, politically unbiased news to the most disconnected areas of Venezuela. This bears testament to the continuing struggle for transparent journalism in regions where access to information is often restricted or controlled.

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