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Celebrated Photographer and Chronicler of Life, Elliott Erwitt, Passes Away at 95

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Emmanuel Abara Benson
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Celebrated Photographer and Chronicler of Life, Elliott Erwitt, Passes Away at 95

Elliott Erwitt, the celebrated American photographer renowned for his black and white images that captured both critical moments in history and the charm of everyday life, has passed away at the age of 95. Known for his unique blend of eyewitness precision and dreamlike curiosity, Erwitt's images were a testament to his relentless pursuit of humor and joy in ordinary moments.

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A Life Shaped by Displacement

Born on July 26, 1928, in Paris to Russian Jewish parents who had fled the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, Erwitt's early life was marked by displacement. He spent his childhood moving from France to Italy, before finally emigrating to the United States in 1939, on the brink of World War II. His experiences during this turbulent time would later shape his approach to photography, with his images often reflecting a sense of longing and a deep understanding of the human condition.

Military Service and Career in Photography

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Erwitt was drafted into military service in 1951 and was stationed in Germany and France. It was during this time that he developed an interest in photography, finding solace in the medium's ability to capture the essence of life amidst the chaos of war. His career took a significant turn in 1953, when he joined Magnum Photos, a cooperative agency for worldwide photographers. He later served as president of the agency in the late 1960s, cementing his status in the world of photography.

Iconic Works and Lasting Legacy

Erwitt's body of work is renowned for its unique blend of humor, humanity, and historical significance. His iconic photograph of then US Vice-President Richard Nixon jabbing Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev's chest during the 1959 'kitchen debate' became a symbol of American assertiveness, even being used in Nixon's 1960 presidential campaign. His candid shots of celebrities, such as Marilyn Monroe, and his playful depiction of everyday life, including a humorous image of male buttocks that drew smiles from elderly observers, are a testament to his ability to find joy in the mundane. Erwitt's legacy, marked by an optimistic view of the world, continues to inspire and uplift, echoing in the halls of La Sucrière in Lyon, France, where a collection of his work will be on display until March 2024.

Erwitt, who was married and divorced four times, is survived by his six children, 10 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. His death marks the end of an era, but his work - a celebration of the absurd and charming moments of life - will continue to resonate with generations to come.

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